The wings will catch you.
hawxr:

Enjoy the traditional life of China by Sixie Lee
什麼樣的永恆

Sometimes I feel like I’m holding your raw soul in my cupped palms, still dripping with warmth and liveliness;

Sometimes the hole you left is so vacant it’s as if you were never here to begin with.

Most other times I daydream —
沈溺在過去的種種,
肖想著未來的如果。

And in the end I’m still here —
答應自己不再妄想,
妄想自己怎麼答應。

不止息的,
這樣也算永恆。

—— 亂想

人總是不甘寂寞,
才憔悴了詩。
人總是不敢安靜,
才惆悵了樂。

—— 眾裡尋她千百度

artandsciencejournal:

The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

hasyanomaki:

風景

hasyanomaki:

風景

thepyrocase:

105号室 by 付録

thepyrocase:

105号室 by 付録

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